Pump and Treat of Contaminated Groundwater at the Ott/Story/Cordova Superfund Site, North Muskegon, Michigan

Site Name:

Ott/Story/Cordova Superfund Site

Location:

North Muskegon, Michigan

Period of
Operation:

February 1996 - Ongoing
(data available through October 2000)

Cleanup
Type:

Full-scale

Technology:
Pump and treat (P&T) using diffused air stripping, sand filtration, and powdered activated carbon treatment (PACT)
- The site has 10 extraction wells and 90 monitoring wells
- Since 1999, the average extraction rate has been 800 gpm
- Off-gases are treated using thermal oxidation

Cleanup Authority:
CERCLA
- ROD issued September 29, 1990 (OU2)

EPA Remedial Project Manager
John Fagiolo
U.S. EPA Region 5
77 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago, Illinois 60604-3507
(312) 886-0800
(312) 886-4071 (FAX)
fagiolo.john@epa.gov

Treatment System Operation Contact
Jim Susan Fishbeck,
Thompson, Carr, and Huber
6090 East Fulton
Ada, Michigan 49301
(616) 676-3824
(616) 67605991 (FAX)
USACE Contact
David Foster
P.O. Box 629
Grand Haven, Michigan 49417
(616) 842-5510 x17
(616) 842-6141 (FAX)
david.l.foster@usace.army.mil

Contaminants:
Halogenated and non-halogenated VOCs, PCBs, and pesticides
- Maximum concentrations detected in groundwater included 1,2-DCA (110,000 ug/L), 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) (7,900 ug/L), benzene (3,800 ug/L), PCE (24,000 ug/L), toluene (38,000 ug/L), and vinyl chloride (50,000 ug/L)

Waste Source:
Disposal of industrial wastewaters and residuals from chemical production in unlined seepage lagoons

Type/Quantity of Media Treated:
Groundwater
- An estimated 1.1 billion gallons of groundwater were treated through October 2000
- Two aquifers were identified at the site
- an unconfined upper aquifer containing an upper unit and a lower unit, and a lower aquifer

Purpose/Significance of Application:
Pump and treat of a multi-aquifer site contaminated with chlorinated and non-chlorinated VOCs and SVOCs

Regulatory Requirements/Cleanup Goals:
- The ROD identified cleanup levels for 19 constituents in groundwater, including VOCs and SVOCs
- EPA selected TOC as an indicator compound for organic contaminants at the site
- Treated groundwater was required to meet discharge criteria in an NPDES permit

Results:
- Groundwater monitoring data shows that progress is being made towards meeting the cleanup goals. As of October 2000, cleanup goals have been met for all contaminants in 27 of the 52 wells sampled.
- TOC concentrations in the area of highest contamination have decreased in the upper unit of the unconfined upper aquifer and in the lower aquifer; TOC concentrations have remained relatively constant in the lower unit of the upper unconfined aquifer.
- Available data on the treatment system (through December 1999) showed that NPDES permit limits were being met for discharge to the river

Cost Factors:
Since startup, 1.1 billion gallons of groundwater have been treated by the remedial system which cost a total (capital plus operating) of $32,123,500, which is equivalent to $30 per thousand gallons of groundwater treated

Description:
The Ott/Story/Cordova Superfund Site, in North Muskegon, Michigan, was used for manufacturing a variety of organic chemicals. In the early 1960s, soil and groundwater contamination were discovered at the site, including VOCs and SVOCs. More than 90 contaminants were identified in the groundwater, including benzene, toluene, chlorobenzene, methylene chloride, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane (DCA), 1,2-DCA, vinyl chloride, and tetrachloroethene (PCE), PCBs, heptachlor epoxide, zinc, copper, and nickel. A ROD for aquifer restoration at this site (OU 2) was signed September 29, 1990.

Groundwater at the site is treated using pump-and-treat using diffused air stripping, sand filtration, and PACT, and monitoring data show that progress is being made towards meeting the cleanup goals, however all cleanup goals have not yet been met. Since startup, 1.1 billion gallons of groundwater have been treated by the remedial system which cost a total (capital plus operating) of $32,123,500, which is equivalent to $30 per thousand gallons of groundwater treated. According to the RPM, there is no longer a visible sheen where groundwater flows into a local creek and the groundwater treatment facility has achieved the NPDES discharge permit limitations throughout its operation.

Also view/download http://cluin.org/download/remed/rse/osc.pdf