Thermal Desorption at the Waldick Aerospace Devices Superfund Site, Wall Township, New Jersey ()

Site Name:

Waldick Aerospace Devices Superfund Site

Location:

Wall Township (Monmouth County), New Jersey

Period of
Operation:

June - October 1993

Cleanup
Type:

Full-scale cleanup

Vendor:

RUST Remediation Services

Technology:
Low Temperature Volatilization System (LTVS)

- Primary treatment unit - rotary drum; external Hauck dual propane/fuel oil burner used to force heated air into the primary treatment unit
- Secondary treatment unit - refractory-lined horizontal cylinder with a burner
- Design capacity of 35 tons/hr; actual average system throughput was 20 tons/hr at a soil temperature of 450 to 500° F

Cleanup Authority:
CERCLA
- Original ROD date: 9/29/87
- Second ROD date: 3/29/91 (replaced in situ air stripping with low temperature thermal desorption followed by stabilization and solidification)

EPA Remedial Project Manager:
Daniel Weissman
U.S. EPA Region 2, EERD
290 Broadway, 19th Floor
New York, NY 10007
(212) 637-4384
USACE Project Lead:
Ron Ackerman
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
New Jersey Area Office
1 Main St. (Suite 416)
Eatontown, NJ 07724
(908) 389-30400

Contaminants:
- BTEX
- Total petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC)
- Volatile organic compounds (VOC) - toluene, tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene
- Metals (cadmium, chromium, nickel, zinc

Waste Source:
Contaminated wastewater discharged directly to the ground; leaking drums of spent machine oil

Type/Quantity of Media Treated:
Soil - 3,450 yd3

Purpose/Significance of Application:
Thermal desorption of soil contaminated with a wide range of organics

Regulatory Requirements/Cleanup Goals:
- Total VOCs - 1.0 mg/kg; total PHCs - 100 mg/kg; cadmium - 3.0 mg/kg; chromium - 100 mg/kg; nickel - 100 mg/kg; zinc - 350 mg/kg
- Air emissions standards were specified in the NJDEPE air permit for the unit for particulates, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, hydrogen chloride, VOCs and metals.

Results:
- The soil treated by the thermal desorber met the cleanup goals for total VOCs and total PHCs.
- The results of the July 1993 testing indicated that the emissions failed to meet air permit requirements, and the unit was shut down on August 26, 1993. On September 8, 1993, NJDEPE approved restarting operations after corrective measures had been implemented and the unit was reported to have met the emission standards.
- No results were provided with regard to concentrations of metals; treated soil was disposed offsite in a RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste landfill.

Cost Factors:
Total cost of $4,995,159 including $3,610,086 for activities related to the remediation of contaminated soil and $1,385,073 for such other activities as demolition of two buildings and off-site disposal of debris, removal of three underground storage tanks and off-site disposal of equipment and debris, and abandonment of 17 wells at the site.
The cost of $3,610,086 for activities related to the soil remediation includes $2,017,361 for the sum of costs for capital and O&M elements; this corresponds to a unit cost of $585 per yd3 of soil treated (3,450 yd3 treated)

Description:
The Waldick Aerospace Devices Superfund Site is a 1.7-acre hazardous waste site located in Wall Township (Monmouth County), New Jersey. The site was used primarily as a manufacturing facility that included degreasing and metal-plating operations. Wastewaters containing heavy metals and solvents were discharged directly to the ground surrounding the main building for a period of at least three years, and spent machine oil leaked onto the ground from perforated drums located near the main building. In 1982, the state ordered Waldick to conduct cleanup activities; however, sampling following these activities indicated that the soil and groundwater at the site were still contaminated with volatile organics and metals. Contaminants included VOCs; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX); petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC); other nonhalogenated volatile organic compounds; and metals. While the initial Record of Decision (ROD) for this site specified in situ air stripping for contaminated soil, a second ROD, signed in March 1991, revised the remedy to replace in situ air stripping with low temperature thermal desorption followed by stabilization/solidification. At the Waldick site, contaminated soils were treated on site using low temperature thermal desorption and residuals were sent off-site for stabilization and solidification and disposal at a RCRA-permitted landfill.

A Low Temperature Volatilization System (LTVS) designed by Rust Remedial Services (Rust) was used to treat an estimated 3,450 yd3 of soil at this site. The unit was trailer-mounted and included feed hoppers/conveyors, a primary treatment unit (rotary drum), a discharge conveyor with pugmill, cyclones, a secondary treatment unit (thermal oxidizer), a quench tower, a baghouse, packed-bed scrubbers with stacks, and a power generator operated with fuel oil. The unit had a design capacity of 35 tons/hr; the actual average system throughput was 20 tons/hr at a soil temperature of 450 to 500° F. The unit operated from June 1993 until the results of stack testing, performed in July 1993, indicated that the emissions failed to meet air permit requirements. The unit was shut down on August 26, 1993. On September 8, 1993, NJDEPE approved restarting operations after corrective measures had been implemented. Operations were restarted at the end of September to treat the remaining soil. The soil treated by the thermal desorber met the cleanup goals for total VOCs and total PHCs.

The costs for excavation of soil and disposal of residuals were relatively high compared with the capital and O&M costs for this application. Approximately $1,000,000 was spent on commercial disposal of treated soil, which may be attributed to the disposal of treated soil as a RCRA hazardous waste. In addition, the RPM indicated that the cost of the project was higher than originally estimated because the total amount of soil treated was greater than had been anticipated.