Incineration at the Celanese Superfund Site, Shelby, North Carolina

Site Name:

Celanese Superfund Site

Location:

Shelby, North Carolina

Period of
Operation:

April 1991 to December 1991

Cleanup
Type:

Remedial action

Vendor:

Terry Elmaggar
GDC Engineering, Inc.
822 Neosho Avenue
Baton Rouge, LA 70802
(504) 383-8556

Technology:
On-Site Incineration
- Solids pretreated with screening and mixing with sawdust
- Incineration system consisting of rotary kiln and secondary combustion chamber (SCC)
- Soil residence time of 45 minutes, kiln temperature of 1,500°F; SCC temperature of 1,900°F
- Treated soil and sludge (incineration ash) discharged into a wet ash collection system

Cleanup Authority:
CERCLA and State: North Carolina
- ROD Date: 3/28/89
- PRP-Lead

SIC Code:
2824 (Manufacturing manmade
organic fibers)
Point of Contact:
McKenzie Mallary
U.S. EPA Region 4
Atlanta Federal Center
100 Alabama Street
Atlanta, GA 30303-3104
(404) 562-8802

Contaminants:
Ethylene glycol, volatile organic compounds, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and phenol

Trichloroethylene, benzene, phenols, lead, chromium, and antimony
Maximum concentrations of ethylene glycol (12,000 mg/kg) antimony (3,000 mg/kg), lead (2,041 mg/kg) and chromium (40 mg/kg).

Waste Source:
Disposal of waste sludges

Type/Quantity of Media Treated:
Sludge and Soil
- 4,660 tons of sludge and soil
- Moisture content: sludge - 25%

Purpose/Significance of Application:
Lowest volume incinerated for all of the case studies

Regulatory Requirements/Cleanup Goals:
Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of 99.99% for each constituent of concern as required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) incinerator regulations in 40 CFR part 264, subpart O

Results:
- Emissions and trial burn data indicate that all DRE and emission standards were met
- Analytical data of residuals indicate that cleanup goals were met

Description:
The site began operation in April 1960 and is still operating. Between 1960 and the early 1980s, plant wastes from the production of polyester raw-material were disposed of in burn pits and sludge was buried in trenches. Between 1970 and 1978, drums of waste chemicals and solvents were stored on site. A site investigation was conducted in 1981. A Record of Decision (ROD), signed in March 1989, specified on-site incineration as the remediation technology for the excavated sludge and soil. Site cleanup goals and DRE standards of 99.99% for constituents of concern were specified in the ROD.

On-site incineration began in April 1991. During its period of operation, the incinerator processed 4,660 tons of sludge and soil. The treatment system consisted of a rotary kiln and an SCC. An enclosed conveyor moved the soil and debris to the kiln for treatment. Treated ash from the incinerator was discharged to a wet ash collection system. The system used an air pollution control system that consisted of a baghouse and a packed-bed scrubber. Incineration achieved the soil cleanup goals specified in the ROD.

The total cost of the remedial action was approximately $5,800,000, including $3,925,000 in capital costs and $1,875,000 in operation and maintenance costs.